Taliban disperses Afghan women’s march for ‘work and freedom’ | News

Taliban fighters beat feminine protesters and fired into the air on Saturday to dispersed a uncommon rally within the Afghan capital, Kabul, days earlier than the first anniversary of the group’s return to energy.

About 40 ladies marched on the schooling ministry in Kabul, chanting “bread, work and freedom”. Regardless of the pledges made when it retook energy, the Taliban has limited Afghan women’s rights, together with conserving highschool lady college students out of college.

Some protesters who took refuge in close by outlets have been chased and crushed by Taliban fighters with their rifle butts, in response to the AFP information company.

The demonstrators carried a banner, which learn “August 15 is a black day” as they demanded rights to work and political participation.

“Justice, justice. We’re fed up with ignorance,” they chanted, many not sporting face veils.

“Sadly, the Taliban from the intelligence service got here and fired within the air,” stated Zholia Parsi, one of many organisers of the march.

“They dispersed the women, tore our banners and confiscated the cell phones of many women.”

However protester Munisa Mubariz pledged to proceed preventing for ladies’s rights.

“If the Taliban need to silence this voice, it’s not attainable. We’ll protest from our houses,” she stated.

Some journalists protecting the demonstration – the primary ladies’s rally in months – have been additionally crushed by the Taliban fighters, an AFP correspondent noticed.

‘Making ladies invisible’

Whereas the Taliban authorities have allowed and even promoted some rallies in opposition to america, they’ve declined permission for any ladies’s rally since they returned to energy.

After seizing management final 12 months, the Taliban has gone again on its guarantees of girls’s rights and media freedom, bringing again reminiscences of its harsh rule from 1996 to 2001.

Tens of hundreds of ladies have been shut out of secondary schools, whereas ladies have been barred from returning to many authorities jobs.

Taliban fighters disperse Afghan women protesters in Kabul.
Taliban fighters attempt to disperse Afghan feminine protesters in Kabul [Wakil Kohsar/AFP]

Ladies have additionally been banned from travelling alone on lengthy journeys and may solely go to public gardens and parks within the capital on designated days, when males will not be allowed.

In Could, the nation’s supreme chief and chief of the Taliban, Haibatullah Akhunzada, ordered ladies to fully cover themselves in public, together with their faces – ideally with an all-encompassing burqa.

The United Nations and rights teams have repeatedly slammed the Taliban authorities for imposing the restrictions on ladies.

These insurance policies present a “sample of absolute gender segregation and are aimed toward making ladies invisible within the society”, Richard Bennett, UN particular rapporteur on human rights in Afghanistan, instructed reporters in Kabul throughout a go to in Could.

Human Rights Watch on Thursday known as on the Taliban to “reverse their horrifying and misogynistic” choice to bar ladies from schooling.

“This might ship a message that the Taliban are prepared to rethink their most egregious actions,” Fereshta Abbasi, Afghanistan researcher on the rights group, stated in an announcement.

Some Afghan ladies initially pushed again in opposition to the curbs, holding small protests.

However the Taliban quickly rounded up the protest organisers, holding them incommunicado whereas denying they’d been detained.

A research by the Worldwide Labor Group (ILO) this 12 months documented a disproportionate drop in ladies’s employment in Afghanistan – 16 % within the months instantly following the Taliban takeover. In distinction, male employment dropped by 6 %.

Taliban fighters fire into the air to disperse Afghan women protesters in Kabul.
Taliban fighters hearth into the air [Wakil Kohsar/AFP]

Previous to the Taliban takeover, ladies made up 22 % of the Afghan workforce. Whereas the determine was nonetheless dismal, it mirrored years of social progress in a deeply patriarchal and conservative society like Afghanistan.

Working ladies in Afghanistan are additionally weak to unemployment shocks because of the current financial disaster, restrictions on ladies’s motion by the Taliban, and the prevalent patriarchy.

Whereas the Afghan financial system has severely suffered because of the Western sanctions on the Taliban, women-centric companies have been among the many worst affected because of the extra restrictions on ladies.

A current World Financial institution survey famous that 42 % of women-owned companies in Afghanistan had briefly closed in contrast with the closure of 26 % of the corporations owned by males.

Moreover, about 83 % of the businesswomen indicated that they have been anticipating income losses over the following six months, forcing them to have interaction in coping mechanisms reminiscent of downsizing their employees, typically comprising largely of girls.

Journalism ‘bleeding to dying’

Quite a few media retailers have ceased their work and a whole lot of journalists have misplaced their jobs within the final one 12 months, in response to Reporters With out Borders (RSF).

“Journalism in Afghanistan is bleeding to dying,” RSF director Christian Mihr stated in an announcement on Friday.

“The Taliban have enacted quite a few legal guidelines that prohibit freedom of the press and encourage the persecution and intimidation of media and journalists,” she added.

In response to RSF, a superb third of 550 media retailers that had been energetic as of August 15, 2021 – the day the Taliban took over management once more after greater than 20 years – have been shut down.

Singapore carries out fifth execution since March | Death Penalty News

Nazeri bin Lajim was hanged early on Friday morning for drug offences, the most recent in a ‘relentless wave’ of executions.

Nazeri bin Lajim, who was convicted of drug trafficking 5 years in the past, has been hanged in Singapore’s Changi Jail.

The 64-year-old Singaporean was executed on Friday morning as scheduled, the city-state’s jail service confirmed in an emailed assertion to the AFP information company.

Singapore has carried out a collection of hangings in latest months, fuelling uncommon debate over the nation’s continued use of the loss of life penalty, notably in medicine circumstances.

“5 individuals have been hanged this yr in Singapore in interval of lower than 4 months,” Amnesty Worldwide’s loss of life penalty skilled Chiara Sangiorgio mentioned in a press release, noting that each one these executed had been drug offenders. “This relentless wave of hangings should cease instantly.”

Abdul Kahar Othman, a Singaporean, was the primary to be hanged, together with his execution on March 30 ending a two-year pause in the usage of the loss of life penalty.

In April, the nation went forward with the execution of Nagaenthran Dharmalingam, a Malaysian with studying disabilities, whose case drew international consideration and quite a few appeals for clemency from his household, United Nations consultants, the European Union and the Malaysian authorities.

The court docket listening to his last appeals mentioned the efforts to avoid wasting Nagaenthran’s life had been a “blatant and egregious abuse” of the authorized course of, and that it was “improper to interact in or encourage last-ditch makes an attempt” to delay or cease an execution.

Nazeri too hoped for a final minute reprieve, arguing from jail by way of Zoom on Thursday for a keep of execution to permit him to discover a lawyer. M Ravi, who represented him beforehand, has had his certificates to apply regulation taken away. The court docket rejected his attraction.

Nazeri was arrested in 2012 after being discovered with 33.39 grams (1.18 ounces) of heroin. Singapore considers anybody with greater than 15 grams (0.5 of an oz.) of the drug to be a trafficker and imposes a compulsory loss of life sentence.

Singapore argues that the loss of life penalty is important to discourage crime and drug trafficking.

In a press release launched after Nagaenthran’s execution, a gaggle of UN human rights consultants mentioned Singapore’s continued use of capital punishment for drug-related crimes was opposite to worldwide regulation. It burdened that nations that maintained the loss of life penalty ought to use it for less than “essentially the most critical crimes” and that drug offences didn’t meet the brink.

The United Nations Workplace on Medication and Crime (UNODC) and the Worldwide Narcotics Management Board (INCB) have additionally condemned the usage of capital punishment for drug crimes.

In its most up-to-date report on the usage of the loss of life penalty world wide, Amnesty Worldwide mentioned that whereas executions surged in 2021, the worldwide development stays in direction of abolition.

At the moment, some 110 nations have abolished the loss of life penalty for all crimes and greater than two-thirds of countries are abolitionist in regulation or apply, it mentioned.