Nicaraguan Catholics gather for mass after gov’t bans procession | Religion News

The Vatican has expressed concern over strikes towards the church amid the continued crackdown by President Daniel Ortega.

Nicaraguan Catholics have gathered for a large-scale mass within the capital, Managua, beneath heavy police presence after a spiritual procession was prohibited by the federal government.

The mass on Saturday adopted a number of strikes towards the church in latest weeks, together with the investigation and confinement of a distinguished priest who had been important of President Daniel Ortega‘s authorities. A day earlier than the gathering, the Vatican for the primary time expressed concern over the latest actions within the Latin American nation.

Church leaders urged followers to attend the mass after they stated the Nationwide Police had banned a deliberate procession by way of the town citing “inside safety”.

Cardinal Leopoldo Brenes stated the attendees congregated “with plenty of happiness, but in addition with plenty of unhappiness” on account of “the scenario we have now lived in our parishes”.

“Forgive them Lord, as a result of they know not what they do,” Brenes stated.

In early August, Ortega’s authorities closed seven radio stations owned by the church and introduced an investigation into Bishop Rolando Alvarez, who has been confined to the church’s compound in Matagalpa together with a number of different monks by police for almost two weeks.

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Catholics arrive for service in Managua after Nationwide Police denied permission for a deliberate spiritual procession, citing ‘inside safety’ [AP Photo]

The federal government has accused Alvarez, a vocal critic, of selling hate and inciting violence. Previous to confining Alvarez, police had confined a priest in Sebaco, additionally a part of the Matagalpa diocese, for a number of days earlier than ultimately permitting him to depart.

On Friday, the Vatican’s everlasting observer to the Group of American States (OAS), Monsignor Juan Antonio Cruz, expressed concern throughout a particular session of the physique’s everlasting council and known as for “discovering paths of understanding primarily based on reciprocal respect and belief, trying above all for the frequent good and peace”.

Throughout the OAS assembly, 27 international locations authorized a decision condemning “the compelled closure of nongovernmental organisations and the harassment and arbitrary restrictions positioned on spiritual organisations” in Nicaragua.

Rights observers say Ortega continues to crack down on freedom of expression and speech following huge anti-government protests that broke out in April 2018. At the least 328 individuals have been killed by safety forces and a whole bunch have been detained, with some allegedly tortured.

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Cops and riot police block the primary entrance to a Catholic church compound in Matagalpa the place Bishop Rolando Alvarez has been confined by police [AFP]

Ortega has maintained the motion was a coup try carried out with overseas backing and assist from the Catholic church.

Police haven’t allowed giant public gatherings within the nation, besides these sponsored by the federal government or the ruling Sandinista Nationwide Liberation Entrance celebration, since September 2018.

Forward of the October 2021 presidential election, Ortega’s authorities arrested dozens of opposition figures, together with these more likely to problem him within the race. Ortega, a former Sandinista insurgent chief, went on to win a fourth time period within the polls, which overseas observers dismissed as invalid.

On Friday, Nicaragua shuttered Radio Dario, one of many final radio stations important of Ortega, its director Anibal Toruno stated on his Twitter account.

Pope Francis heads to Nunavut for final stop on Canada visit | Religion News

Pope’s six-day go to to Canada will wrap up with assembly with residential faculty survivors and public occasion in Iqaluit.

Warning: The story beneath incorporates particulars of residential faculties that could be upsetting. Canada’s Indian Residential College Survivors and Household Disaster Line is out there 24 hours a day at 1-866-925-4419.

Pope Francis is heading to Canada’s northern territory of Nunavut to fulfill with survivors of residential schools, as the top of the Roman Catholic Church wraps up a six-day go to to Canada that has drawn combined reactions.

The pope will journey to Iqaluit on Friday afternoon to privately meet survivors and attend a public occasion earlier than flying again to Rome.

The trip’s final stop comes after Pope Francis firstly of the week apologised for the “evil” of residential faculties, the forced-assimilation establishments rife with abuse that Indigenous youngsters have been obligated to attend for many years between the late 1800s and Nineteen Nineties.

“I humbly beg forgiveness for the evil dedicated by so many Christians towards the Indigenous peoples,” he mentioned throughout an occasion on Monday in Maskwacis, close to Edmonton within the western province of Alberta, describing the results of the establishments as “catastrophic”.

The Catholic Church ran a majority of the 139 federally mandated residential faculties throughout Canada, which a fee of inquiry in 2015 decided amounted to “cultural genocide”.

For many years, Indigenous leaders had referred to as on the church to apologise for its role within the residential faculty system, and the papal apology provided this week has been welcomed by some survivors as an vital step within the path to healing.

Others have called on Pope Francis to go additional and acknowledge the Catholic Church’s institutional function within the harms dedicated at residential faculties, not simply apologise for the actions of members of the church.

“Regardless of this historic apology, the Holy Father’s assertion has left a deep gap within the acknowledgement of the complete function of the Church within the Residential College system, by inserting blame on particular person members of the Church,” Murray Sinclair, the previous chair of the Fact and Reconciliation Fee of Canada (TRC), mentioned in a statement this week.

“You will need to underscore that the Church was not simply an agent of the state, nor merely a participant in authorities coverage, however was a lead co-author of the darkest chapters within the historical past of this land,” Sinclair mentioned.

Indigenous people hold a banner reading 'Rescind the Doctrine' during a papal mass in Quebec
Indigenous individuals maintain a banner studying, ‘Rescind the Doctrine’ as Pope Francis presides over a mass in  Quebec, July 28, 2022 [Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters]

Indigenous leaders and neighborhood advocates even have urged Pope Francis to rescind the Doctrine of Discovery, an idea specified by fifteenth Century papal bulls that acknowledged European colonialists might declare any territory not but “found” by Christians.

The papal bulls performed a key function within the European conquest of the Americas, and their results are nonetheless felt at present by Indigenous peoples throughout the area.

“These Papal decrees grew to become the idea for the legalized possession of all lands on North America, which we name Turtle Island. It stays ingrained within the constitutional, legislative, and authorized techniques in Canada and the US,” the Haudenosaunee Exterior Relations Committee mentioned in a statement on Wednesday.

“An apology to Indigenous Peoples with out motion are simply empty phrases. The Vatican should revoke these Papal Bulls and arise for Indigenous Peoples’ rights to their lands in courts, legislatures and elsewhere on the earth.”

In the meantime, a serious demand of Inuit communities in Nunavut has been the extradition from France of a Catholic priest accused of sexually abusing youngsters within the northern territory, the place he was based mostly between the Sixties and Nineteen Nineties.

Canadian media shops reported this week that the Division of Justice mentioned it had made an extradition request for Johannes Rivoire. It didn’t present additional particulars.